March 26, 2019
  • 2:34 pm Committee Leadership Comes into Focus for 116th Congress
  • 2:22 pm Interstate System Report Calls for More Funding, Tolling, VMT Fees, and Cybersecurity
  • 2:15 pm In Memoriam: President George H. W. Bush, ISTEA, and Transportation
  • 1:56 pm Growth Projected for Transportation Projects, but Costs a Challenge
  • 1:35 pm FAA Reshuffles Executives, Plans Drone Identification Rulemaking in Spring 2019
  • 1:28 pm Predictive Technology Helps Reduce Crashes on I-15 Corridor in Las Vegas
  • 1:14 pm Video Report: MoDOT Produces Multi-Lingual Safety Message
  • 1:11 pm PennDOT Nears Completion of Rapid Bridge Replacement Project
  • 1:08 pm Infrastructure Grants Awarded to “Smaller” South Dakota Communities
  • 12:19 pm State DOTs Battle Major Flooding Across the Midwest
  • 12:11 pm FHWA Says Road Travel Set Mileage Record in 2018
  • 12:09 pm Transit Sector Seeks Investment, Faces Technological Change
  • 12:03 pm Dickson Nominated to be FAA Administrator
  • 12:00 pm Study Finds ‘Super Commuting,’ Working-From-Home Experiencing Fastest Growth

To help minimize storm water run-off from highways and parking lots, the Virginia Department of Transportation recently began testing “permeable” or “porous” pavement, which is designed to allow water to pass through the pavement surface into the underlying base material, with the water allowed to seep into the roadway or parking lot’s underlying soil to be discharged via an outlet by way of an underdrain.

A 24-page report conducted for VDOT in June by the Virginia Transportation Research Council concluded that, “depending on the site-specific conditions of a given project, porous asphalt has the potential to be less expensive and/or less intrusive than some other storm water BMP or [best management practice] alternatives, primarily because it can be placed within the footprint of the facility and therefore does not require additional right-of-way for construction.”

editor@aashto.org

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