July 15, 2020
  • 9:19 am Caltrans Announces Statewide Plan to Increase Walking, Bicycling
  • 12:28 pm Tennessee DOT Celebrates Completion of I-440 Project
  • 12:27 pm New Iowa Highway Safety Campaign Focuses on Moms, Moms-to-Be
  • 12:25 pm SCDOT Enhances 511 Traveler Information System
  • 12:23 pm New Guardrail Repair Strategy Generates Savings for Georgia DOT
 

The Indiana Department of Transportation officially released $115 million in state-matching funds on March 26 to 189 Indiana cities, towns, and counties to support local road projects through the “community crossings initiative” that is part of the state’s overall Next Level Roads program.

[Above photo by Indiana DOT.]

“Indiana’s fully-funded, long-term Next Level Roads plan means cities, towns, and counties are improving their roads and bridges at levels unmatched in our state’s history,” noted Gov. Eric Holcomb (R) in a statement. “Community Crossings projects are crucial to first mile and last mile solutions that companies need when evaluating Indiana to locate their business or expand to create additional jobs.”

Gov. Holcomb at podium. Photo by the Indiana Governor’s Office

The governor added that Indiana’s community crossings initiative has provided more than $500 million in state matching funds for construction projects over the last two years, with the most recent $115 million disbursement garnering 229 applications.

In response to local requests to help manage project flow, INDOT Commissioner Joe McGuinness said his agency now accepts applications in both January and July, with a $1 million annual cap per application per community. He estimated that $100 million will be available for communities that apply during the 2019 “summer call” for projects, with state law requiring that 50 percent of the available matching funds be awarded on an annual basis to communities within counties with a population of 50,000 or fewer.

“Local leaders are improving the conditions of local roads and bridges all across the state with funding from the Community Crossings Initiative,” McGuinness said in a statement. “The partnership model with the state sharing in the cost of local projects means Hoosier taxpayers receive great value as communities deliver needed projects.”

To qualify for funding, local governments must provide local matching funds – 50 percent for larger communities or 25 percent for smaller communities – from a funding source approved for road and bridge construction. They must also submit an INDOT-approved asset management plan for maintaining existing roads and bridges.

 

editor@aashto.org

RELATED ARTICLES
%d bloggers like this: