August 24, 2019
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The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials recently issued the second edition of its “Guidelines for Geometric Design of Low-Volume Roads,” available from the AASHTO Store by clicking here.

First published in 2001, AASHTO’s guidelines aim to help highway engineers select appropriate geometric designs for local and collector roads with low daily traffic volumes.

AASHTO said the first edition of its low-volume guidelines addressed the design needs of roads carrying average daily traffic volumes of 400 vehicles per day or less.

The new second edition of its low-volume road guidance not only replaces the first edition but also includes design advice for local and minor collector roads carrying average daily traffic volumes of 2,000 vehicles per day or less, the organization said.

AASHTO added that its low-volume roads geometric design guidelines can be used in lieu of applicable policies presented in its broader “A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets” handbook, commonly known as the “Green Book.”

 

editor@aashto.org

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