August 20, 2019
  • 2:34 pm Committee Leadership Comes into Focus for 116th Congress
  • 2:22 pm Interstate System Report Calls for More Funding, Tolling, VMT Fees, and Cybersecurity
  • 2:15 pm In Memoriam: President George H. W. Bush, ISTEA, and Transportation
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  • 1:35 pm FAA Reshuffles Executives, Plans Drone Identification Rulemaking in Spring 2019
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  • 1:14 pm Video Report: MoDOT Produces Multi-Lingual Safety Message
  • 1:11 pm PennDOT Nears Completion of Rapid Bridge Replacement Project
  • 1:08 pm Infrastructure Grants Awarded to “Smaller” South Dakota Communities
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  • 12:22 pm AASHTO President: “Transportation Represents Freedom”
  • 12:19 pm Leadership Reset Underway for Several Transportation Agencies
  • 12:13 pm IIHS Study: Street-Level Protected Bike Lanes Need Improvements
  • 12:08 pm FRA Unveils NOFO for $244M in FY 2019 CRISI Grants

A massive boulder weighing some 1,150 tons – some 2.3 million pounds – tumbled down about 1,000 feet on May 24 as part of a major rock slide that ended up blocking a section of the two-lane highway linking the Colorado towns of Cortez and Telluride.

The boulder proved so large that the Colorado Department of Transportation used explosives to pulverize it so it and other debris from the rock slide could be cleared from the roadway.

The agency added that a second 8.5-million-pound boulder rolled across the highway, leaving in its wake a wide 8-foot-deep trench in the road’s surface it filled in and repaired.

The Colorado DOT noted on its Facebook page that its maintenance division had to build a temporary dirt road as part of a detour around the rockslide area, as that two-lane highway is the only direct surface transportation between the towns of Cortez and Telluride. That dirt-road detour – controlled by a portable stoplight array – allows for one-lane alternating traffic around the rock fall area.

editor@aashto.org

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