October 20, 2019
  • 2:34 pm Committee Leadership Comes into Focus for 116th Congress
  • 2:22 pm Interstate System Report Calls for More Funding, Tolling, VMT Fees, and Cybersecurity
  • 2:15 pm In Memoriam: President George H. W. Bush, ISTEA, and Transportation
  • 1:56 pm Growth Projected for Transportation Projects, but Costs a Challenge
  • 1:35 pm FAA Reshuffles Executives, Plans Drone Identification Rulemaking in Spring 2019
  • 1:28 pm Predictive Technology Helps Reduce Crashes on I-15 Corridor in Las Vegas
  • 1:14 pm Video Report: MoDOT Produces Multi-Lingual Safety Message
  • 1:11 pm PennDOT Nears Completion of Rapid Bridge Replacement Project
  • 1:08 pm Infrastructure Grants Awarded to “Smaller” South Dakota Communities
  • 11:16 am TNC Hearing Touches on Transportation Funding Issues
  • 11:13 am Study Links Real Estate Values to Public Transportation Access
  • 11:10 am Artificial Intelligence Key Building Block for States, But a Security Risk, Too
  • 11:02 am Conservancy Report Projects ROI from Active Transportation Investments
  • 10:58 am Colorado DOT-Sponsored Highway Maintenance Course in High Demand

Bob Brock (seen above), director of aviation and unmanned aircraft systems at the Kansas Department of Transportation, was one of 12 new members named to the Federal Aviation Administration’s Drone Advisory Committee.

Photo by the Kansas DOT

The 35-member DAC is a broad-based, long-term federal advisory committee that provides the FAA advice on key unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) integration issues by helping to identify challenges and prioritize improvements. The committee helps to create broad support for an overall integration strategy and vision, the agency noted in a statement.

“Continuing to grow aviation in Kansas is a priority for KDOT, and we can’t be more pleased to have innovative people like Bob lead the way for transportation in this important industry,” said Julie Lorenz, Kansas’ secretary of transportation, in a statement.

[Editor’s note: A 2019 survey conducted by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials indicates that 36 out of 50 state departments of transportation or 72 percent are now funding centers or programs to operate drones. That’s up from 20 out of 44 state DOTs or 45 percent in AASHTO’s 2018 survey.]

The Kansas DOT is also among the first 10 participants in FAA’s UAS Integration Pilot Program, initiated in May of last year.

Data from that program helping the FAA and the U.S. Department of Transportation craft new “enabling rules” to allow for: more complex low-altitude operations by drones; identify ways to balance local and national interests related to UAS integration; improve communications with local, state, and tribal jurisdictions; address security and privacy risks plus accelerate the approval of operations that currently require special authorizations.

editor@aashto.org

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