June 25, 2019
  • 2:34 pm Committee Leadership Comes into Focus for 116th Congress
  • 2:22 pm Interstate System Report Calls for More Funding, Tolling, VMT Fees, and Cybersecurity
  • 2:15 pm In Memoriam: President George H. W. Bush, ISTEA, and Transportation
  • 1:56 pm Growth Projected for Transportation Projects, but Costs a Challenge
  • 1:35 pm FAA Reshuffles Executives, Plans Drone Identification Rulemaking in Spring 2019
  • 1:28 pm Predictive Technology Helps Reduce Crashes on I-15 Corridor in Las Vegas
  • 1:14 pm Video Report: MoDOT Produces Multi-Lingual Safety Message
  • 1:11 pm PennDOT Nears Completion of Rapid Bridge Replacement Project
  • 1:08 pm Infrastructure Grants Awarded to “Smaller” South Dakota Communities
  • 12:42 pm Senate Committee FAST Act Hearing Highlights 5.9 GHz, NEPA Issues
  • 12:39 pm Annual ‘State of Logistics’ Report Highlights Freight Infrastructure Needs
  • 12:34 pm Subcommittee Hearing Focuses on Challenges, Threats Posed by Drones
  • 12:30 pm Preliminary 2018 Data Shows Rise in Pedestrian, Bicyclist Fatalities
  • 12:25 pm USDOT Offers $293M in Port Infrastructure Development Grants

President Donald Trump signed into law H.R. 2157 – the “Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act of 2019” – on June 6 that provides $19.1 billion to cover recovery and other costs associated with a series of catastrophic disasters that have struck the United States over the past three years.

[Official White House photo above by Shealah Craighead.]

That money includes $3.3 billion in funds for the Army Corps of Engineers to repair damages caused by natural disasters, to invest in new flood and storm damage reduction projects, and to make the U.S. infrastructure “more resilient” to future natural disasters.

Photo by Missouri Army National Guard Staff Sgt. Christy Van Drunen

The Federal Highway Administration receives $1.6 billion from H.R. 2157 to help bolster its Emergency Relief “quick release” funding program, which state departments of transportation are tapping to help them repair roads and bridges damaged by a range of disasters, including the recent Midwest flooding.

Additionally, the Federal Transit Administration gets $10.5 million for its emergency relief program from this additional appropriations funding as well.

Finally, the Disaster Relief Act also makes certain “language changes” to existing law to allow the Federal Aviation Administration to access unused 2017 emergency funds to help defray 2018 disaster recovery costs.

 

editor@aashto.org

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