September 17, 2019
  • 2:34 pm Committee Leadership Comes into Focus for 116th Congress
  • 2:22 pm Interstate System Report Calls for More Funding, Tolling, VMT Fees, and Cybersecurity
  • 2:15 pm In Memoriam: President George H. W. Bush, ISTEA, and Transportation
  • 1:56 pm Growth Projected for Transportation Projects, but Costs a Challenge
  • 1:35 pm FAA Reshuffles Executives, Plans Drone Identification Rulemaking in Spring 2019
  • 1:28 pm Predictive Technology Helps Reduce Crashes on I-15 Corridor in Las Vegas
  • 1:14 pm Video Report: MoDOT Produces Multi-Lingual Safety Message
  • 1:11 pm PennDOT Nears Completion of Rapid Bridge Replacement Project
  • 1:08 pm Infrastructure Grants Awarded to “Smaller” South Dakota Communities
  • 12:31 pm Coalition Letter Continues to Urge Repeal of Rescission
  • 12:25 pm Tolling, Congestion Pricing Debated at House Hearing
  • 12:22 pm Letter Argues AV Safety Must be “Paramount Concern”
  • 12:15 pm EPA, Dept. of the Army Formally Repeal 2015 WOTUS Rule
  • 12:12 pm INRIX Study Highlights Potential of Micromobility

The January closure of the Alaskan Way Viaduct in downtown Seattle – also known as State Route 99 – was another step in a long reclamation project that will eventually remove highway and repurpose the land it occupies.

According to the Washington State Department of Transportation, removing the viaduct will be completed in three stages: site preparation, demolition, and site restoration. The agency noted all of that can be tracked via its viaduct demolition tracker, which is updated weekly.

Once a portion of the viaduct has been demolished, WSDOT said crews must restore the work zone to its former condition. In this case, “restoration” means re-opening streets, sidewalks, and parking that was available before the removal process began, the agency explained.

After crews demolish a section of Seattle’s Alaskan Way Viaduct, they must remove the rubble, restore parking and reopen streets; a three-week process captured in the video below:

The land where the viaduct once stood will not remain static for long. Once the viaduct has been completely removed, the city of Seattle will step in to begin construction of the Waterfront Seattle project.

WSDOT earlier this year opened the new $3.3 billion, 2-mile-long SR 99 tunnel that replaced the viaduct.

editor@aashto.org

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