August 17, 2019
  • 2:34 pm Committee Leadership Comes into Focus for 116th Congress
  • 2:22 pm Interstate System Report Calls for More Funding, Tolling, VMT Fees, and Cybersecurity
  • 2:15 pm In Memoriam: President George H. W. Bush, ISTEA, and Transportation
  • 1:56 pm Growth Projected for Transportation Projects, but Costs a Challenge
  • 1:35 pm FAA Reshuffles Executives, Plans Drone Identification Rulemaking in Spring 2019
  • 1:28 pm Predictive Technology Helps Reduce Crashes on I-15 Corridor in Las Vegas
  • 1:14 pm Video Report: MoDOT Produces Multi-Lingual Safety Message
  • 1:11 pm PennDOT Nears Completion of Rapid Bridge Replacement Project
  • 1:08 pm Infrastructure Grants Awarded to “Smaller” South Dakota Communities
  • 12:26 pm Survey Finds Consumers “Lack Confidence” in Autonomous & All-Electric Vehicles
  • 12:22 pm AASHTO President: “Transportation Represents Freedom”
  • 12:19 pm Leadership Reset Underway for Several Transportation Agencies
  • 12:13 pm IIHS Study: Street-Level Protected Bike Lanes Need Improvements
  • 12:08 pm FRA Unveils NOFO for $244M in FY 2019 CRISI Grants

A long-awaited Ultra-High-Speed Ground Transportation Business Case Analysis issued on July 12 claims that an all-electric high-speed rail network linking the major Pacific Northwest cities could cost between $24 billion to $42 billion to build while providing between 1.7 million to 3.1 million one-way one to two-hour annual trips at start-up.

The exact route and type of ultra-high-speed transportation has not been determined and would require more analysis, the study noted. All trips are expected to include a stop in greater Vancouver, British Columbia, the Seattle metro area and Portland, Oregon, it noted.

City of Seattle

Some trips also may include additional stops in other cities, the study said, including: Surrey, British Columbia, and Bellingham, Everett, Bellevue/Redmond, Tukwila, Tacoma, Olympia and Kelso/Longview in Washington, the report noted.

According to the study, this ultra-high-speed system is projected to travel at speeds exceeding 200 mph via some form of high-speed rail, magnetic levitation, or hyperloop technology.

The all-electric system would be stand-alone, rather than sharing or relying on existing infrastructure, the report indicated, and would include some elevated tracks and tunnels with no at-grade crossings with roads.

The Washington State Department of Transportation, in partnership with the Oregon Department of Transportation, put the report together with the Province of British Columbia and Microsoft helping share in the costs.

Graphic via WSDOT

Both studies grew out of ongoing Cascadia Innovation Corridor planning efforts, WSDOT said in a statement – a cross-border coalition bringing together business, academic and government leaders to build a global hub of innovation and commerce in the Pacific Northwest.

An advisory committee representing the public, private, and nonprofit sectors from Washington, Oregon and British Columbia, provided input during the year-long technical analysis as well, WSDOT noted, with consulting firm WSP along with Steer Davies Gleave, EnviroIssues, Paladin Partners and Transportation Solutions helping complete the final draft.

editor@aashto.org

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