January 26, 2020
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  • 1:14 pm Video Report: MoDOT Produces Multi-Lingual Safety Message
  • 1:11 pm PennDOT Nears Completion of Rapid Bridge Replacement Project
  • 1:08 pm Infrastructure Grants Awarded to “Smaller” South Dakota Communities
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  • 12:37 pm State DOT CEOs Address Role of Equity in Transportation
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The Nevada Department of Transportation reported on November 7 that construction is now halfway done on the state’s second longest bridge: a 2,635-foot-long highway “flyover” structure that will connect northbound U.S. Highway 95 to the westbound 215 Beltway in northwest Las Vegas.

[Above photo by Nevada DOT.]

That flyover – which provides direct freeway-to-freeway connections while still maintaining highway travel speeds for greater efficiency and safety – is part of the larger $73 million Centennial Bowl interchange project that broke ground in January, the agency noted in a statement.

The 75-foot-tall by 39-foot-wide bridge is a box girder type structure built from cast-in-place concrete that equals the length of seven football fields laid end-to-end, providing one travel lane in each direction linking north-to-west freeway traffic. The bridge uses 18,900 cubic yards of concrete, or enough to fill six Olympic-sized swimming pools, delivered by 1,500 cement mixer truck trips.

editor@aashto.org

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