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SAE International endorsed a “framework” for describing Advanced Driver Assistance Systems or ADAS technology developed by AAA, Consumer Reports, J.D. Power and the National Safety Council on May 12.

That framework – a two-page document called Clearing the Confusion: Recommended Common Naming for Advanced Driver Assistance Technologies originally issued in November 2019 – clearly explains specific ADAS functionality for motorists, including: Driving Control Assistance; Collision Warning; Collision Intervention; and Parking Assistance, among others.

Graphic by AAA

“With advanced safety technologies being added to new vehicles every year, we recognize that it’s important that consumers understand the technologies they are using and common descriptions can help,” said Chad Zagorski, chair of SAE’s active safety systems standards committee, in a statement.

“Educating drivers on key terms such as ‘Lane Keeping Assistance’ and ‘Automatic Emergency Braking’ helps drivers have consistent expectations and awareness of the functionality of their vehicle’s Advanced Driver Assistance Systems,” he added.

Zagorski noted that SAE’s Active Safety Terms and Definitions Task Force is currently revising its SAE J3063TM Standard: Active Safety Systems Terms and Definitions – a more detailed document for use by automotive engineers – with those common definitions in mind.

Graphic by USDOT

He said the update to SAE J3063 will be “more robust” as a result of the input from community of stakeholders engaged in the current “Clearing the Confusion” effort.

“These recommendations are not meant to replace automaker proprietary system or package names, but rather help identify key functions within those packages and provide clarity to consumers,” emphasized Keith Wilson, SAE’s technical program manager. “As safety technologies advance and as new systems are developed, we plan to work with stakeholders to refine the naming outline to keep the public and industry informed.”

editor@aashto.org

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